Category: <span>Colorblindness</span>

Color Perception, Photoreceptors and the Different Types of Colorblindness

Contrary to what the name suggests, colorblindness isn’t an absolute blindness to color. The perception of color is a complex process involving the eyes and the brain, and even two people who consider themselves “color vision normal” may disagree on certain hues – is that sunset more pink or purple? In a person with a diagnosed color vision deficiency (a more accurate term), they usually will experience what is considered a “shortened spectrum”, meaning they are able to distinguish fewer colors compared to a color-normal person and may confuse a few different shades as the same color. In Caucasian populations, the overall prevalence of colorblindness is typically quoted as 8% in males and 0.5% in females. A study conducted in Californian preschool boys found the lowest rate of colorblindness in African American at 1.4% and the second lowest in Hispanic boys at 2.6%.

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Research & Publications

Dry Eye Relief Using Nasal Neurostimulation

There are a lot of things that can be done through the nose. You can breathe through your nose, sneeze through your nose, …

The Best Way to Recover from Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery is typically a straightforward, uncomplicated procedure. Because cataracts are considered a normal part …

Is Smoking Bad for Your Eyes?

The dangers of cigarette smoking have been well-known for decades. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists tobacco …